Albums

Albums of the Month: April

Here are the albums of April that we think you would like. Click on the image to be taken to the artist’s spotify page. We have also created a spotify playlist containing all the albums listed here.

Team Ghost - You Never Did Anything Wrong To Me EP

Team Ghost - You Never Did Anything Wrong To Me EP

A diverse a collection of songs from an electronically based outfit, Fromageau and associates have taken the blueprint of his former outfit M83, mixed it up with the odd tinge of krautrock, disco and post-punk and majestically conjured up a dazzling array of sounds that suggests their forthcoming debut album will be a mouthwatering prospect indeed. – DrownedinSound

Erykah Badu - New Amerykah Part Two: Return of the Ankh

Erykah Badu - New Amerykah Part Two: Return of the Ankh

You may not want to fall in love with this 21st century siren of R&B, soul, neo-funk, but you will. Badu’s tone is serious but playful, and so gentle yet firm and carefully measured. Part Two is a smoother, more delicate and accessible affair than Part One, worthy of repeated listens not only because it’s a work of art but also because it’s so much fun. – Popmatters

Sonny & the Sunsets - Tomorrow Is Alright

Sonny & the Sunsets - Tomorrow Is Alright

San Francisco’s Sonny & the Sunsets cull their sound from time-honored sources on their debut. Smith’s bent sense of humor and his sweet, scraggly pipes further sets them apart from their obvious sonic forebears. No matter how you dressed these tunes up, they’d still feel cool, confident, and at times, wickedly funny. – Pitchfork
The Tallest Man on Earth - The Wild Hunt

The Tallest Man on Earth - The Wild Hunt

Kristian Matsson plays to his strengths, he keeps it simple, finger-picking strings to propel his gristly vocal melodies, which feel simultaneously cavalier and carefully wrought. His songs are uncluttered by percussion, harmonized vocals or the kinds of orchestral ornaments that are so prevalent in current alt-folk. – Paste Magazine
Dark Dark Dark - Bright Bright Bright

Dark Dark Dark - Bright Bright Bright

On first listen, it’s easy to let the dreamy piano sweep back and forth, and drift off into the background. But doing so ignores the way the song builds, with violins peaking here and there. Invie’s vocals eventually swell, sustained by the band’s backing singers. Drums are pounded to build an orchestral tension that the Arcade Fire create so well. – DrownedinSound

BitBasic - Farwah

BitBasic - Farwah

BitBasic, has managed to produce four tracks of completely different styles that somehow fit together seamlessly, referencing everything from electro to breaks, hip hop to IDM. Packed full of live instrument samples, understated confusion and a wistful guitar riff that repeats throughout the track, gestures wildly in the direction of Four Tet. – DorwnedinSound
Archie Bronson Outfit - Coconut

Archie Bronson Outfit - Coconut

The album’s throbbing bass lines and spacey drone jams are sewn together by pleading vocals from singer/guitarist. The band’s grizzled sound like a well-worn T-shirt—but it’s the emotional pull of his wail that really accentuates the band’s palpable and caustic garage jams. It’s haunting and gentle, fragile and flaky all at the same time. – Popmatters
The Hoa Hoas - Pop, Drone, Pedals

The Hoa Hoa's - Pop, Drone, Pedals

Pop/Drone/Pedals’ opener, the afropop rhythms and minimal guitars mark their trail from post-punk to more ephemeral territories. In the lyrics there’s moral judgment distinguished by the soft aesthetic and nervous tension. Their pursuit is pure head-fuckery – to drive the listener into a mangled state with bizarre, exotic sounds, and ‘hoa-hoa’ heavy guitar solos. – DrownedinSound
Jónsi - Go

Jónsi - Go

Jónsi Birgisson doesn’t do small. As the lead singer of Sigur Rós, he’s starred in several of this century’s most epic songs; with their penchant for instrumental swells, feedback, and weight-of-humanity wails, the Icelandic band has practically set a new, near unreachable height for melodramatic art rock. But what truly elevates Go is Jónsi’s voice, which still has the ability to stun a decade after Agætis Byrjun introduced most listeners to his alien bleats. – Pitchfork

Harlem - Hippies

Harlem - Hippies

Young, emerging guitar rock bands are lately investing a lot of thought and time into ensuring that their pop music is as steeped in fuzz and scuzz as possible. They care deeply about one thing, and that’s their songwriting. Enamored with the Pixies, they are committed to crafting bubblegum choruses flavored with booze and cigarettes. – Pitchfork

The Futureheads - The Chaos

The Futureheads - The Chaos

Producers David Brewis, of Field Music, and Martin Glover Youth, let them get on with what they do best, packing the energy densely into these songs like dark matter. The title track is full of oblique references to society’s woes and the refrain. They are made of the sort of hooks that snare themselves in your brain for weeks and then make themselves so at home you’ll feel like they’ve been around for year. – DrownedinSound

Music Go Music - Expressions

Music Go Music - Expressions

They understand how to make the sort of pop music that bridges the generation gap, what is best about the Californian trio is that they do it without even a whiff of irony. The key however, is Gala Bell’s voice and the delights it brings, which boast hooks and melodies galore, the sort that lodge themselves in your head for days, using your brain as a dancefloor. – DrownedinSound

Surfer Blood - Astro Coast

Surfer Blood - Astro Coast

It’s a great guitar album like Weezer’s Blue Album, Built to Spill’s Keep It Like a Secret, or, more recently, Japandroids’ Post-Nothing. Its snowblind-ish reverb is still disorienting– especially contrasted with its crisp, power-chord hook. Topics of concern include confusion about romance, confusion about friendship, confusion about the future, confusion about religion. But ambition can just as easily manifest itself as a desire to create a relentlessly catchy, “classic indie” album. – Pitchfork

To Rococo Rot - Speculation

To Rococo Rot - Speculation

German trio To Rococo Rot build from subtle static drone to thick bass dribbles before introducing Faust’s Jochen Irmler, playing his sad, swirling self-made organ. Now on their eigth album, they have developed their template of post-rock instrumentation augmented by electronica flourishes. – DrownedinSound

Delorean - Subiza

Delorean - Subiza

Delorean helped define the bright, beachside vibe of last summer’s indie landscape, but they also deserve to be placed in a broader context. On their new album, Subiza, the Spanish four-piece deploys the build-and-burst tempos of 90s house and techno music, and they do so explicitly, never shying away from arms-in-the-air piano bridges or incandescent raves. This music is proudly informed by the resiliency and vigor of classic club music, and its title (named after the Basque town in which the album was recorded) recalls the famously nightclub-centric Ibiza and the Balearic dance music that originated there. – Pitchfork

Dr. Dog - Shame, Shame

Dr. Dog - Shame, Shame

If their previous album, Fate was Mercury Rev, all rural imagery and natural wonder, then Shame, is The Flaming Lips, a little more vibrant in colour and mystical in its outlook, with its woozy, looping keyboards and strained, reedy vocals giving the song a beautifully wistful mood. Built around looping, fluid basslines and loose, expressive drums, songs range from delicate and dreamy, to gruff and bluesy. – DrownedinSound

Caribou - Swim

Caribou - Swim

In his decade-long career, Dan Snaith has fluidly moved between genres like folktronica, shoegaze, krautrock, and 1960s sunshine pop, assimilating their most familiar traits until they’re practically in his DNA. His albums have felt warm, loose, and ecstatic (especially 2003’s still-career-best Up in Flames), Swim, is even heavier on the precise sonic detail, and it’s all the more impressive for it. – Pitchfork

The Radio Dept. - Clinging to a Scheme

The Radio Dept. - Clinging to a Scheme

The Radio Dept. have the kind of surreal trip-hop bounce of latter-day Blur, another group once tagged as indebted to the ghosts of shoegaze past, JAMC-Joy Division. It nestles down on a beautiful bed of gently picked guitars before a sample cuts in. Gears swiftly shift gorgeously creating more modernistic instrumentation, which could be one of Belle and Sebastian’s mellower jams. – Popmatters

The Goldheart Assembly - Wolves and Thieves

The Goldheart Assembly - Wolves and Thieves

They strive to write conventional pop songs, while descending into a slightly sinister web of high-pitched laughter, and the whole of the album is brushed with this sense that a mass of ideas are being crammed into the space of 12 songs. Delights in finding new paths for their ideas is best found on the ‘Engraver’s Daughter’. Starting as a sparse acoustic strum, it soon picks up pace and starts to glide down a sunkissed American highway like a long-lost Seventies rock classic. – DrownedinSound

Ted Leo and The Pharmacists - The Brutalist Bricks

Ted Leo and The Pharmacists - The Brutalist Bricks

Leo has crafted the kind of album that contains all the ambitions and fully realized dreams he was aiming for on Living with the Living. Like all Ted Leo albums, The Brutalist Bricks is a mix of political defiance, personal growth, emotional honesty, and a heartfelt self-sacrifice. Despite Leo’s eclecticism, he’s still a product of the Dischord hardcore scene. While it has solidified Leo’s sound, it localizes him to a time and place, despite all his eclecticism. – Prefix

Nedry - Condors

Nedry - Condors

They combine all kinds of electronic, synthesised sounds (bleeps, glitches, keyboard tunes, strange effects and all) with the deepest, bassiest dubstep-style bass. Ayu Okakita’s striking voice; part little-girl-lost, part haunting/haunted siren, she adds another rich, if perplexing, layer. The overall effect is often unsettling, creepy, and positively hair-raising. – MusicOMH

Willie Nelson - Country Music

Willie Nelson - Country Music

A great pleasure is hearing Nelson duck and dodge amidst the textures conjured by a top-drawer, full-bore country band. His voice remains lean and tawny, it wears its years, which means that, more than ever, his impact as singer largely depends upon that masterfully reserved approach to phrasing, an approach utilized to full effect throughout the album. – Popmatters

Apples In Stereo - Travellers in Time and Space

Apples In Stereo - Travellers in Time and Space

They treat the listener to an extraordinary echo of modern music history via bandleader Robert Scheider’s remarkable internalization of previous decades of pop/rock. The adoption of disco sounds and techniques, exploring a wide gamut of 1960s pop/rock song styles, the band sounds completely energized. – Popmatters

Cornershop - Judy Sucks a Lemon for Breakfast

Cornershop - Judy Sucks a Lemon for Breakfast

Here, on the band’s first album in seven years, he returns with the profoundly playful shrug of a cosmopolitan busker. Bubbles with rollicking piano and a biting, inscrutable chorus, Singh’s songwriting meanders at times, but he’s never less than a captivating host. – Spin

Tunng - ...And Then We Saw Land

Tunng - ...And Then We Saw Land

Their experimental, electronic flourishes have always set them apart from traditional folk. It is a lovely little hop, skip and jump of songs, featuring a delightful shuffle of acoustic guitar loop and some perfect harmonies.It showcases of some lovely vocal interplay between the two leads before bursting gloriously into the chorus with a wonderful sense of release. – MusicOMH

65daysofstatic - We Were Exploding Away

65daysofstatic - We Were Exploding Away

It may not be the most consistent thing album you will hear all year; it may even causing the fault-lines in their fanbase to widen. But more than ever, that’s irrelevant. Noisy or electronic, We Were Exploding Anyway has rekindled the old flame with its unabashed power and inexorable sonic passion. – DrownedinSound

Anais Mitchell - Hadestown

Anais Mitchell - Hadestown

Anaïs Mitchell folk opera adds another record to this coveted pile, comfortably aligning herself with Sufjan Stevens, Joanna Newsom. Singer-songwriters possessing both the audacity to take on brain-weltingly big concepts and the sheer talent required to pull them off. It is, simply, irresistible, and what follows attempts to communicate exactly how so rather than acutely deconstruct. Because if you can’t wax lyrical about such perfectly realised flights of ambition on sites like this one, then… well. You might as well be done with it. – DrownedinSound

Alcest - Ecailles De Lune

Alcest - Ecailles De Lune

This is the most fully realized effort to date from its frontman and lone constant Neige. When both legitimately heavy bands like Wolves in the Throne Room and Liturgy and electronic acts like Ben Frost and Fuck Buttons are using black metal ideas to build something bigger, Neige lands one of the most cohesive, well-considered experiments yet creating arching atmospherics, celestial melodies and suffocating roars. – Pitchfork
– Chris Jones

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2 Comments on this post.
  • future stress recordings
    11 May 2010 at 17:15
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    Thanks for supporting Sonny & the Sunsets!

    THE HYPNOTIST 7″ + Digi-Download
    AVAILABLE NOW on {future stress recordings}

  • V
    14 May 2010 at 17:57
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    65daysofstatic’s album is awesome. Think pendulum mixed with ‘and so I watched you from afar’ mixed with ‘explosions in the sky’. Sublime, but their earlier work is even better…

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