Albums

Albums of the Month: March

Here is our list of albums that we think you might like. As always we have provided links to the artists spotify page by clicking on the album art, and created a spotify playlist containing all the albums listed.

Errors - Come Down With Me

Errors - Come Down With Me

‘Where at one moment they could be a solid angular rock entity, the next an electro mash up behemoth. It has forged all of the disparate pieces of the past into something evergreen, its tenderness is tangible because of its loneliness, and only amplified by the Stone Roses-esque chords from closing track ‘Beards’’. – DrownedinSound

Titus Andronicus - The Monitor

Titus Andronicus - The Monitor

‘Titus Andronicus have split the emotional atom with anthemic chants, rousing sing-alongs, celebrations of binge drinking, marathon song titles, broken-hearted duets, punked-up Irish jigs, and classic rock lyric-stealing. The Monitor is a 65-minute endorsement of angst and opposition as the best way to present that combustible sorrow’ – Pitchfork

The Ruby Suns - Fight Softly

The Ruby Suns - Fight Softly

‘The mash-up of soul, disco, R&B, electronica and African percussion. This has the airy free spirit exhibited on their two previous outings, like a watercolour built up from layers of opaque colour stacked on top of one another to create something pastoral and beautiful, there is a lot going on.’ – DrownedinSound

Liars - Sisterworld

Liars - Sisterworld

‘This is more like the David Lynch, second half of Mulholland Drive, homeless guy behind the dumpster version of the City of Angels. There is a consistency in sound between this and the previous records, with a slightly less claustrophobic vibe this time out. What makes this band great is their ability to go where we don’t want them to go and then to linger, until it’s time to leave.’ – NoRipcord

Gorillaz - Plastic Beach

Gorillaz - Plastic Beach

‘Albarn dips into Krautrock, funk, and dubstep, as well as the weary, more melodic music he’s been perfecting for much of last decade– sort of an electronic take on baroque pop. His collaborations with Little Dragon, “Empire Ants” and “To Binge” are two of the most arresting things here, they’re airy, elusive, and amazingly beautiful. It’s been years since Albarn has written anything as blatantly gorgeous.’ – Pitchfork

Blood Red Shoes - Fire Like This

Blood Red Shoes - Fire Like This

‘They’ve taken the blueprint of their debut and built on it.Their effortlessly skilful utilisation of the quiet-loud dynamic is still present, only this time infused with a little bit more subtlety. The interplay between the two is as effective as ever, which is just as well because their chemistry has always been one of the band’s strongest assets, whether live or on record.’ – DrownedinSound

The Knife with Mt. Sims & Planningtorock - Tomorrow, In A Year

The Knife with Mt. Sims & Planningtorock - Tomorrow, In A Year

‘The line between what is music and art has been pushed here more than ever, the creative duo of Karin (Fever Ray) and brother Olof have taken electronic and classical music and set it in a Darwin world where the sound of birds tweeting and a euphoric atmophere is represented in a way that can be felt and imagined with such beauty and awe that its an experience like a treck thought the amazon. The sounds just unravell in front of you, whilst you let it take you where it is going, the avid listener will be looking around to see what other delights that it is hiding.’ – Chris Jones

Frightened Rabbit - The Winter of Mixed Drinks

Frightened Rabbit - The Winter of Mixed Drinks

‘Catapulted by frantic strumming and handclaps of solidarity into a climatic stream of consciousness, it’s clear that Hutchinson is past lamenting what could have been. It manages to avoid losing its hook or sense of melody in its wall of sound chorus, that charts its protagonist’s emotional progress: from the fragile, slightly bitter isolation of ‘Things’ and the nonchalant self-imposed quarantine that ‘Swim Until You Can’t See Land’ recounts,’ – DrownedinSound

Joanna Newsom - Have One on Me

Joanna Newsom - Have One on Me

This 3xLP set has some of the most inviting and accessible songs of Newsom’s career, while songs here evoke moments of Ys and Milk-Eyed and Newsom’s harp is still the dominant musical focus, creating more of a deepening process, where her earthy presence has a way of drawing you in. – Pitchfork

Broken Bells - Broken Bells

Broken Bells - Broken Bells

Plaintive in mood and oriental in style, its laconic feel is as fitting as it is overpowering. With more songs ready to record, Broken Bells look set to be here for the long haul, and with such high standards set by their opening gambit, we can but wait patiently in anticipation for the next installment. – DrownedinSound

Quasi - American Gong

Quasi - American Gong

There’s an inherently joyous delivery to the lrics that offsets their recurring themes of age and mortality from start to finish. Coupled with the scene-stealing guitar solos, the ever glorious Weiss creates rhythms that are more focussed leaving American Gong feeling like a rebirth of a band too often dismissed as an afterthought. – DrownedinSound

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club - Beat The Devils Tattoo

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club - Beat The Devil's Tattoo

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club were being lauded as the rock’n’roll outfit to carry the torch into the post-millennial abyss and beyond. The love affair ended almost as briefly as it had begun, but over the past nine years, they pushed their own cosy fan-encrusted niche without ever realising the potential or expectations set from the outset. If there were ever a reason for Black Rebel Motorcycle Club’s existence, this would be it. – DrownedinSound

High on Fire - Snakes for the Divine

High on Fire - Snakes for the Divine

High on Fire are, nestled somewhere between traditional, doom, stoner, and thrash. They embody everything that is fun about heavy metal, and no matter how unpredictable they can be as far as production goes, we’ll always know that there’s no such thing as a bad High on Fire album, and Snakes For the Divine is no exception. – PopMatters

The Besnard Lakes - The Besnard Lakes are the Roaring Night

The Besnard Lakes - The Besnard Lakes are the Roaring Night

The Besnard Lakes seem to owe more of a debt to their early ’90s shoegazing British cousins rather than any of their Canadian compatriots (Arcade Fire). There are layers of fuzzy guitars, ethereal vocals and, every so often, a big burst of melody that sounds almost cathartic. On their second album they build layers of distorted guitars on top of each other while Olga Goreas’ honey-sweet vooice mixes perfectly with husband Jace Lasek’s backing vocals to make a heart-stopping, atmospheric song. – MusicOMH

Fang Island - Fang Island

Fang Island - Fang Island

Fang Island describe their aesthetic as “everyone high-fiving everyone,” and on their wildly infectious second album, the Brooklyn rockers take manic musicianship and shoutalong choruses to another level– even with only a couple of verses and choruses. Like any post-punk record while also speaking the language of classic rock, yet often feels like an intricate collage pieced together from elements that make songs memorable. – Pitchfork

Junk Culture - West Coast

Junk Culture - West Coast

The label that’s brought you key works from Girl Talk and Steinski introduces this new project by Deepak Mantena, who takes a sample-surfing slant on laptop wonk, slicing up vocal cut ups and heavy, compressed beats through tracks like the opening ‘West Coast’ and the excellent ‘That’s Not Me’ which at certain points sounds like a hip hop version of The Field. – Boomkat

White Hinterland - Kairos

White Hinterland - Kairos

A blissful, sometimes eerie electronic album with sometimes sinister undertones bubbling under the smooth surface, helped by a nod or two to dubstep’s gloomy atmospherics on more than a few tracks. Dienel’s voice is the focal point here. Bearing an uncanny resemblance to Björk at times, and sounding like she’s auditioning for a role with Zero 7. There is dark, gloomy rumble punctuated only by clipped scattered beats while there’s a weirdly unsettling edge to closing track Magnolia, despite Dienel’s sweet as honey vocals. – MusicOMH

Emma Pollock - The Law of Large Numbers

Emma Pollock - The Law of Large Numbers

Pollock’s debut was fairly charming and instant but a little slight, The Law of Large Numbers is the total opposite; a wonderfully simple, clever and loveable record initially masquerading as a complex and awkward one. Its a slow-burning but utterly delightful record, every song has its own unique charms that will continue to unveil themselves after hours of listening. – DronedinSound

Serena Maneesh - S-M 2: Abyss in B Minor

Serena Maneesh - S-M 2: Abyss in B Minor

Maneesh’s second album has the word ‘abyss’ in its title because it was recorded in a cave. Thes scandinavian shoegazers manage to replicate the soothing ambience of a chilly grotto without having to resort to actually being in such a grotto. This album carries with it an aesthetic much more overpoweringly reminiscent of MBV’s American cousins Medicine. Its sound is large, dark and all-consuming. This is the point at which you have to shake off your disorientation and accept that you are a part of it. – DrownedinSound

Laura Marling - I Speak Because I Can

Laura Marling - I Speak Because I Can

shrugs off virtually all traces of girlishness and wide-eyed charm, instead delving into darkly elemental, frequently morbid folk. She’s created a haunting, fully flowered gem of an album despite being younger than two-thirds of the Jonas Brothers. These are folk-rock songs, but she uses folk as an archetypal form to get at the essential realities of love, sex, heartbreak, and death. – Pitchfork

Clipse - Til the Casket Drops

Clipse - Til the Casket Drops

Malice spits dismissively on ‘Freedom’, single-handedly wiping away everything he espoused on 2006’s Hell Hath No Fury and echoing his brother’s malaise. Seems like the recession has hit the bank balances of hip-hop’s most shamelessly flamboyant duo, and unlike Young Jeezy, they aren’t exactly taking it in their stride. However, this is the period of quiet consideration, the cathartic purging of two very hubristic souls, if I’m allowed to extend Greek tragedy to hip-hop. It is also peppered with juicy sounding synth lines, cut up vocal samples and the occasional live drum and guitar track giving their beats a bit more meat. – DrownedinSound

Love Is All - Two Thousand and Ten Injuries

Love Is All - Two Thousand and Ten Injuries

They rattle out youthful exuberance and, lyrically, almost comical heartbreak. From spidery guitar lines scurrying through squalls of saxophone to metronomic drumbeat plays goofily in the background, they are a hyperactive, almost childlike version of punk, with the bare bones intact but with little touches of experimentation on the periphery, but also a post-punk meets dance hybrid of bands like The Rapture or Gossip. – MusicOMH

– Chris Jones

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