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Blown Away: Wind Turbines For University Park Campus

The University has announced plans to build three wind turbines, on the banks of the River Trent, to help power University Park campus. If plans are approved, they will directly supply University Park with enough ‘green’ electricity to power 5,000 houses, accounting for a third of the campus’ needs.

It forms part of the University’s wider scheme to reduce its carbon footprint and fight climate change. The University’s wind turbines will reduce carbon emissions by 7000 tonnes per year, equating to 40% of its target reductions required by 2015. There are also plans to begin other renewable energy projects at other University sites, which could use biofuel heating and solar cells as energy sources.

Currently, the university is ranked low in the ‘People and Planet Green League 2010’, which ranks universities according to how environmentally friendly their facilities are; while Nottingham Trent University falls in joint fifth place, Nottingham ranks 53rd out of 133 universities nationwide.

The Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Infrastructure and Environment, Professor Alan Dodson, said: “Success in reducing our carbon footprint will also have an impact on the amount of funding that we receive from the Higher Education Funding Council for England, thus helping to ensure that we can continue to pursue our agenda of excellence in education.”

The proposed site for the turbines is near Clifton Bridge on the River Trent. At up to 125 metres high, the turbines will be clearly visible from parts of Beeston and the A453 and A52 approach roads.

The proposals are subject to planning approval, for which an application will be submitted in February of next year. If approved, the turbines will be installed in 2012, with construction taking approximately 6 months to complete. The application, however, only allows for the turbines to be in place for the next 25 years – presumably until a greener and more efficient alternative comes along.

Fiona Crosby and Becky Wilson

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One Comment
  • Paul Johnson
    1 February 2011 at 11:26
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    They may supply “enough ‘green’ electricity to power 5,000 houses”, but none of the electricity is actually going to be sent to local houses, or any houses at all, at least as I understand it.

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