News

UoN Students Face Increasing Energy Bills

This week has seen the six largest UK energy firms summoned in front of the Energy and Climate Change committee to justify the recent price hikes.

The average duel fuel bill has risen to around £1400 per year, with four energy companies raising their rates by around 9%, due to increasing wholesale prices.

In the face of a prospective increase in charges, Ed Miliband announced an energy price freeze last month if Labour wins the 2015 general election.

This comes in the context of a sharp increase in fuel bills in the past few years. In 2008, a dual-fuel bill would have been £752; now it is up to £1,264.

19 of 28 second year students admitted that they had chosen to stay in halls for their penultimate year, where utilities were included in the rent, in order to avoid price fluctuations and the potential hassle of switching providers.

Impact decided to find out how University of Nottingham (UoN) students may be affected by price hikes.

Most UoN students interviewed said they found their energy bills to be affordable with their student loan.

19 of 28 second year students admitted that they had chosen to stay in halls for their penultimate year, where utilities were included in the rent, in order to avoid price fluctuations and the potential hassle of switching providers.

One student questioned by Impact admitted that she had paid far more in energy bills when renting a house and had found herself quickly building up debt, as she used more energy than she had paid for in the winter months.

Fixed prices seem to be the most popular and cost-saving option for students.

However, some students did note that switching energy providers to find the best deal is well advertised for the student population and that energy bills are affordable as long as you shop around.

Many didn’t see the need for switching, however, because housing agencies often offer a fixed amount each month centred on their bills and rent.

Fixed prices, therefore, seem to be the most popular and cost-saving option for students if they want to avoid the upcoming price hikes.

Gemma Coleman

Campus Reporter

Follow Impact News on Twitter and Facebook.

Categories
News

Leave a Reply