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UoN Loses Over £1m In Funding For Scholarship Places

The University of Nottingham (UoN), along with other universities and further education (FE) institutions, has seen its provisional allocation of state funding for scholarship places reduced by £1,238,000.

A recently released document outlines that there will be a reduction in funding of the Government’s ‘National Scholarship Scheme’; an initiative introduced to increase social mobility and improve access to further and higher education by funding disadvantaged students.

The number of state funded UoN scholarships has decreased from 622 scholarships at £3000 per student to 311 at £2000 per application.

In March 2013, the Government had allocated UoN £1,860,000 but this amount was reduced to £622,000 in November 2013.

The number of state funded UoN scholarships has decreased from 622 scholarships at £3000 per student to 311 at £2000 per application.

The funding available at a national level has also been cut from £150 million to £50 million for 2014 to 2015.

In the  2013 Autumn Statement, it was then revealed that the National Scholarship Programme (NSP) may be cut all together in the future.

A first year UoN History and Politics student said, “It is important to consider the impact of these cuts in funding on each [educational] institution individually.

It is clear that some of the most prestigious and attractive universities, such as UoN, will struggle to attract prospective students from disadvantaged backgrounds. These cuts will mean that some students will cross the UoN off their list of potential universities.”

“Whilst there have been certain reductions made in scholarships, UoN is still better than most”.

However, first year Modern Languages and Business student Sam Roberts took a different view, claiming that the University will still be able to fund disadvantaged students in spite of the significant reduction in government funding.

“It would be easy to say that this reduction in funding will be catastrophic for the UoN; but it’s not as if the University will simply sit back and not put in place any safeguards to help fund students in the future.”

Mike Dore, UoN Students’ Union Equal Opportunities and Welfare Officer, told Impact: “Whilst there have been certain reductions made in scholarships, UoN is still better than most when it comes to support for current students in the form of student bursaries and additional funds e.g. the Access to Learning Fund (ALF).

“We are still considering the implications and will be sharing any changes with the Students’ Union”.

The University is also at an advantage when it comes to the high ratio of bursary and fee waivers. Any students c0ncerned about the cuts should consult the Student Services Financial Support page for further information.”

In response to the lose of government funding, a University spokesperson said: “We are still considering the implications and will be sharing any changes with the Students’ Union, OFFA (Office for Fair Access), and, of course, applicants as soon as we have reviewed the situation in full.”

For further details on the threat of  state reductions in scholarship programmes, click here.  

Jacob Bentley

Campus Reporter

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Lead image: wwarby via Flickr

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