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Nottinghamshire police to wear body video cameras

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Plans have been announced for police in Nottinghamshire to wear body video cameras while out on patrol.

The scheme is aimed at discouraging anti-social behaviour, reducing crime and helping the police to bring more criminals to justice.

The cameras are currently undergoing testing at Sneinton, Sutton, and Central stations before the scheme is rolled out at the beginning of August.

Inspector Simon Allen, regional lead on body-worn cameras, stated that the cameras will provide a powerful tool for the police.

“There will be less cops injured and off sick, less time spent at court at more people will plead guilty and less complaints for police to deal with”

“The cameras will also help moderate officer and offender behaviour – people are less likely to play up when they see they’re being recorded, while officers will perhaps be a bit more patient and more tolerant”.

It was revealed last year that the police service had been awarded a £1.7 million grant from Whitehall to fund the scheme along with the Nottinghamshire police matching the funding.

Allen went onto say, “There will be less cops injured and off sick, less time spent at court at more people will plead guilty and less complaints for police to deal with. That means that potentially we will have more cops on duty at any one time”.

Owen Morris, a first year business management student, said, “I think it’s great for both the police and the public. It allows the police to have video evidence of any incidents that may occur and also protects the public from any false statements. I think it is an important advancement in policing and hope to see it widespread in the near future”.

Nottinghamshire Police and Crime Commissioner Paddy Tipping said he was pleased to see the plans become action.

“The evidence taken on cameras can be used at court and will cut out a lot of paperwork and bureaucracy. It will also lead to better behaviour as people will know when cameras are recording”

“There will be a number of benefits. The evidence taken on cameras can be used at court and will cut out a lot of paperwork and bureaucracy. It will also lead to better behaviour as people will know when cameras are recording”.

The first station to use the cameras will be the Meadows station with the roll-out expected to take place from August to late autumn.

Phil Matthews, chairman of the Nottinghamshire Police Federation, stated that, “We think the cameras will benefit our members, for example in terms of fewer malicious complaints against officers and more prosecutions in court”.

Hannah Eves

Image: flickr

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